Nature

Red Panda at Calgary Zoo
Red Panda: ISO 800, 130mm, f/5.0, 1/250

Another set of photos from my Calgary Zoo walk last week. My previous visits to the Calgary Zoo, these two Red Pandas were usually hiding or sleeping. Last week was a different story. Both were very active, one even showed off his climbing skills. I was impressed!

 Red Panda in Tree at Calgary Zoo
Red Panda in Tree: ISO 800, 150mm, f/5.0, 1/400

Watchful Wolf at the Calgary Zoo
Watchful Wolf: ISO 800, 110mm, f/4.0, 1/250

We are currently experiencing spring like weather here in the Calgary area. I took advantage of a warm, overcast day and headed to the Calgary Zoo with my annual Membership pass. I figured if I was willing to go out and enjoy the fresh air, so would the animals at the Zoo. I will share more of my snaps in the coming days.

This wolf was pacing in her enclosure. I believe she was watching for elk in the next enclosure over.

Pine Siskin, Nyger Seed Feeder, birding, Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
Pine Siskin: ISO 800, 200mm, f/5.6, 1/125

I have placed Nyger seed feeder sacs in our crab apple tree in hopes of luring goldfinches. When I noticed these birds enjoying the seed I thought I finally attracted female goldfinches.

Turns out this is a Pine Siskin. They seem to be getting used to me as I was able to get quite close to them without scaring them off.

Testing the Ice


Testing the Ice: ISO 400, 263mm, f/5.6, 1/1500

This is another series of photos from my photo walk at Bower Ponds in Red Deer on Saturday morning. This Park is just across the river from downtown Red Deer. It is part of the park system that goes along the river valley throughout the city.

We have deer running the neighbourhood streets where I live but I never can get the camera out quick enough to prove it!

I am assumming this set of deer is a mother and two of her babies from last year. The pictures show that one is much larger than the other two. They came out of the woods to see what was going on in the river. They are on ice in the second picture.



Testing the Ice II: ISO 400, 168mm, f/4.5, 1/2000

I was using my 70-300mm zoom lens without a tripod to get these shots. This lens does not have image stabilization. It was early morning with cloud cover so I had to use a large aperture to let as much light in as possible. If I were to come across this again I would be carrying my tripod or at the very least my monopod to allow me to use a smaller aperture and get a sharper image.



Close Encounter: ISO 400, 190mm, f/4.5 1/180

Mom, while on the river, heard this man walking on the trail. She is leading the other two who are not far behind across the trail into the much denser brush. I tried to follow them but they were much too fast or real good at playing hide and seek.

Returning Home


Flight: ISO 200, 81mm, f/4.5, 1/1000

The Canada Geese have returned to Canada from their vacation trip down to the USA. Like all Canadians, the geese like the warmer weather the USA has to offer in the winter.


The Chase: ISO 200, 149mm, f/4.5. 1/500

As my previous post has mentioned there still is ice on most of the ponds and lakes in the area I live. The Red Deer River is just starting to break up were the current is the strongest. During my early morning photo walk I found these geese waiting for the morning sun to warm them on the Bower Ponds' frozen surface. Canada Geese are monogomous. They don't like to share and the pair in this picture must not like the third wheel because whenever she became too close they would give chase.

Tooth Sharpener


Beaver Stump: ISO 100, 35mm, f/8, 1/40

Went for a photo walk this morning at Red Deer's Bower Ponds. As I was driving home from work last night I seen that Canada Geese had arrived. A sure sign that spring is coming! I thought I could get some good pictures of the geese on the remaining ice on the ponds and river. The only water that isn't frozen is a narrow path going down the centre of the Red Deer River where the current is strong.

I came across this along the river bank looking for photo opportunities of geese. I didn't see any beaver but the shavings look fairly recent. A beaver's teeth never stop growing so that they don't wear down as they constantly gnaw on wood for food and protection.

I will post more images of my photo walk at Bower Ponds in the days ahead. Keep checking back!

Neighbour's Pet

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